Friday, May 16, 2008

Life Hacks for Doctors: An Introduction

4 comments:

Berci Meskó said...

Joshua, that's an amazing slideshow!

Fantastic job!

Christian Sinclair, MD said...

Excellent slides with some great points. Is there any audio to go along with it?

As far as efficiency is there a point to the pretty pictures? That seems to be a model of inefficiency for the material presented! They were pretty though.

Efficiency management should be part of a good medical school or residency training.

On the grouping visits point, I would be concerned that after seeing 5 patients in a row and not doing documentation that somethings may get missed, such as orders, physical exam findings, etc. Any thoughts?

SCG (Alberto) said...

I am a bit puzzled on the strategy of examining all patients, then writing notes down. Wow, you will save 400 dollars but what about if you forget to write something down or confuse a patient for another or any other mistake that probabily you would have never made if you hadn't slept just 3 hours the night before?
Considering too much our time just as money can really expose to mistakes and malpractice: as in Gawande's book Complications (if I remember right): there is this MD who schedules as much patients as possibile, tries to be super efficient but he ends up in making a mistake caused by his obsession for efficiency. I just wanted to suggest this issue... I am putting this blog in my feeds!

Joshua Schwimmer, MD, FACP, FASN said...

Thanks for the comments!

I hope the slides don't give the impression that the focus should be on money and/or time to the point that accuracy or the doctor-patient relationship is sacrificed. The idea is that you become more efficient in order to emphasize the right things.

Grouping together writing notes, examining patients, etc. is an effective strategy only if you can remember the details of the patients you've seen. It's easy to write down significant findings on an index card, if necessary. Seeing more than ten patients and then writing about them is probably not a good idea, I agree.